I think I am drawn to some Colorado wildflowers just BECAUSE of their names. The Pearly Everlasting (Anapahlis margaritacea) would have to be one of those flowers. (And who could resist a flower whose scientific name has the word “margarita” in it)? 🙂

pearly everlasting

pearly everlasting

pearly everlasting

pearly everlasting and locoweed

Fun Pearly Everlasting Facts:

  • The leaves and young plants are edible when cooked.
  • The caterpillars of the American Lady Butterfly use pearly everlasting as a host plant.
  • Margaritacea is derived from the Latin word for “pearl-like.”
  • They are commonly used in dried flower arrangements, hence the “everlasting” part of the name.
  • Common uses for this species by Native Americans included poultices for treatment of sores, boiling in tea or a steam bath for rheumatism, or smoked to treat colds. The plant was also among many native s pecies used as a tobacco substitute.
  • The papery, white, petal-looking parts are actually bracts.
  • The plant is dioecious, meaning the male and female reproductive parts exist on separate plants (unlike most flowers that have both pistil and stamen within the same flower).
  • Members of the daisy family
  • There are around 110 species of Anapahlis in the world, with most being native to central and southern Asia. Anapahlis margaritacea is the only species native to North America.
  • Grows everywhere in the US except for the southern states.

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