Day 4 of our Iceland adventure involved a very long drive and was the most spectacular day yet. Here are some of the highlights:

Foss á Siðu

Foss á Siðu

Dverghamrar ("Dwarf Rocks")

Dverghamrar (“Dwarf Rocks”)

It is rumored that Dverghamrar is a dwelling place of the Huldufólk or “hidden people.” We didn’t see any hidden people (of course, because they’re hidden) but I’m pretty sure we heard them.

Walking through an Icelandic forest

Walking through an Icelandic forest

The running joke in Iceland is that if you get lost in an Icelandic forest, just stand up. This forest was a little taller than that, however, but also very small.

Fossálar

Fossálar

I’m not sure if Fossálar is this waterfall’s true name as there was no signage, but I did a Google search and it seems to be well-known by that name. However, Fossálar means “Foss Alarm” in English and I think that is just a bit too punny to be a waterfall’s real name. I like it, though. And the waterfall was amazing.

The approach to Skeiðarársandur and the glacier Vatnajökull

The approach to Skeiðarársandur and the glacier Vatnajökull

Remnants of a bridge destroyed by the 1996 eruption of Grímsvötn and the ensuing jökulhlaup.

Remnants of a bridge destroyed by the 1996 eruption of Grímsvötn and the ensuing jökulhlaup.

A jökulhlaup is a glacial outburst flood that is the result of a subglacial eruption. They generally produce an insane amount of water.

A vast field of lupine.

A vast field of lupine.

Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón (“Glacier River Lagoon”) is a glacial lake that started to form around 1934 by the retreat of the glacier  Breiðamerkurjökull. Large chunks of ice calve off the glacier on a regular basis and are deposited in the lake, where they remain until they become small enough to get swept out to sea via the river Jökulsá. It is a stunningly beautiful and fascinating place, the experience of which is only slightly marred by the vast quantity of visitors (and, per Mom, by the dearth of pancakes).

Jökulsárlón was our turnaround spot so after taking a ridiculous number of photos, we began the 3-hour drive back to our cottage. We had remarkably decent weather during our journey on Day 4, only to return to more pouring rain on the way back. Sigh.

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